47: Walter Mosley

Mosley is one of my favourite authors. He seldom tells a story that isn’t about social inequity and man’s inhumanity to man. But he never forgets the story, which rises above all. Combined with memorable characters and a fine flourish in manipulating the English language, he is almost always worth reading.

This one is a melange, YA with historical fiction, the supernatural, aliens and love in many forms.

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Lethal White: Robert Galbraith (JK Rowling)

The core of his excellent mystery serial is the unlikely relationship and sexual tension between Cormoran and Robin, who by now are shared partners in the detective agency. Unfortunately, it should be the plot that carries that along and illustrates it instead of having it jammed down our throats and choking the life out of the story. The worst of the four. Rowling says it is the favorite book she has written. I hope she’s gotten it out of her system and gets back to writing good, balanced stories.

The Burglar in the Closet: Lawrence Block

My last review was of a book by Nancy Kress, a Writer’s Digest columnist. Today’s book was also written by a former columnist for the same magazine, Lawrence Block.

I have been a fan of Block’s, a repeat Edgar Award writer, for many years.

His Bernie Rhodenbarr “burglar” series was probably my least favourite of his several serials. Recently, I re-read his 2nd entry in the series, “The Burglar in the Closet.”

Unfortunately, it wasn’t as good as I remember his other series. Either I or this work haven’t aged well. The writing is a bit too “loose,” with too many coincidences and self-expository passages to make it a good read.

The reader would do well to try Block’s “Scudder” series, or even the “Evan Tanner” offerings.

The Thirst: Jo Nesbo

The problem with writing books in as good a series as Nesbo’s Harry Hole story line is that sooner or later, like a first love, the bloom comes off the rose. After being wowed by an entry in the series, you somehow feel “cheated” when a next book is only “very good.”

The Thirst, while introducing a couple of new, intriguing characters (Hello Anders Wyller!) has too many clunky red herring littered throughout, creating a “fishy” plot line.