The Long Way Home (the verdict)

Not as superbly plotted as other Penny novels, with some missed stitches, but Penny still nails her characterization of the complex makeup and motivation of ordinary lives.

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The Long Way Home, #6

[on having a too-controlled, button-downed, persona; relying too much on intellect and not enough on heart]

“Do you think he’d [Peter] lost his mind?”
“I think … Peter could afford to lose some of his mind. It wouldn’t necessarily be a bad thing.”

The Long Way Home, #4

On how formal education, learning, improving oneself, doesn’t always make things better…

[looking at some paintings hanging in a restaurant after having previously looked at some much superior painting by a master in a gallery]

“If he hadn’t looked into the windows of the Galerie Gagnon, Jean-Guy might have thought these [restaurant paintings] were quite good. But he had looked. And now he knew the difference. Part of him regretted that. He might now like better things, but he also liked fewer.”

The Long Way Home, #2

Penny on feeling jealousy for what other people have, of feeling hatred towards people in your life and the devastating effect this has on yourself instead of the intended target(s). In this case, it refers both to Inspector Gamache’s feelings for his parents (who died when he was young), and successful but staid artist Peter Morrow who can’t accept that his artist wife accomplishments and talents have outstripped his own.

“It’s like drinking acid,” said Myrna, “and expecting the other person to die.”

The Long Way Home, #1

I’ve worked overseas over half my life, in eight different countries and have been surprised not only at the sheer number, but large proportion, of severely messed up people I’ve met, ¬†far more than those that were comfortable simply staying at home.

One of Penny’s quotes echoes a thought that has long been in mind on that subject.

“The investigators knew that most people who took off were running from unhappiness. Loneliness. Failure. They ran, thinking the problem was one of location. They thought they could start fresh somewhere else.”

“It rarely worked. The problem was not geography.”