Silesian Station: David Downing

#2 in the series; damn, damn fine pie.

My current favorite “thriller” writer. Gets all the details right. Realistically lets us know how average people are affected by political and economic situations in the inter-war European period.

Mmm, mmm, good.

On to the next.

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DARK STAR: Alan Furst

Furst provides us a grim reminder of how even the commonest of people’s lives were upturned and capsized by the base, selfish actions of European despots as the events leading to WWII unfolded around their legs.

It should give us pause to remember how much of the world’s populace still lives such capricious lives today, and a stark reminder of how fragile the system put in place in the post-war West, one that provided peace and prosperity for close to 100 years, could just as quickly unravel, as today’s modern leaders once again put their personal selfish needs above the world’s.

All the Light You Cannot See: Anthony Doerr

An orphan boy and a blind girl caught up on opposite sides of the maelstorm called World War II. ALL THE LIGHT YOU CANNOT SEE has all the makings of a trite, cliched pantomime. Instead, it is a searing portrait of WWII daily life, focusing on common people instead of major events and battles and heroes and villains.

Werner has charmed me forever.

It’s not often I agree with the majority (I’ve only ever voted for a successful politician once), but this clearly belongs on all the bestseller lists.

The Expats: Chris Pavone

Mm, mm, good! A spy thriller in the best tradition of Le Carre and Steinhauer. The tension and plot is almost entirely psychological, with multiple layers of deceit and lying among the characters. There is very little violence and weapons appear only rarely, but the pace and tension crackles.