Intelligence in War: The value–and limitations–of what the military can learn about the enemy/John Keegan

Many, many trees. Many of them. A whole lot. Trees, trees and more trees. More than enough. Too many.

Very little forest. Not enough (more’s the pity, as he arrives at the correct conclusions ).

https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/most-secret-source-darvin-babiuk/1114041730?ean=2940045130547

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/248890

https://www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/most-secret-source-the-role/9781301042975-item.html?ikwid=darvin+babiuk&ikwsec=Home&ikwidx=16

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Killing Commendatore: Haruki Murakami

Meh.

Were this Murakami’s first novel, it’s doubtful he’d find a publisher.

Whilst the translation is pretty good, the translator is perhaps too true to the original Japanese; words at times seem clunky, but (having a knowledge of the Japanese language) I believe that that is because the translator is faithfully translating directly from the Japanese. Unfortunately, words and phrases often used in everyday Japanese do not have the same frequency or acceptance their English versions do.

A Wanted Man: Lee Child

Short, declarative sentences. Sharp, snappy dialogue. A flexible moral compass. Just get the job done. It must be Jack Reacher. From the bestseller lists, a very “wanted man.”

One caveat: Child’s novels are all so very clearly delineated in terms of story arc, character and style that it wasn’t until Chapter Six that I wasn’t entirely sure I hadn’t read this one before.

Glass Houses: Louise Penny

Long time readers of these book reviews will know that Penny and I have long enjoyed an intensely deep romance, starting with delight at finding someone interesting and new, progressing through growing interest, moving to infatuation, and climaxing in her best work so far, THE BEAUTIFUL MYSTERY. Since then, our relationship has moved on, grown, less passionate, only making it stronger, more like understanding and cuddling now, spooning, accepting when she forgets to shave her legs or steals the blankets in the middle of the night. By Book #20, we’ll be checking each other’s backs for suspicious moles.

It’s because of this, that I know too much about her, that I feel comfortable giving Penny some advice, because of how much she’s exposed to me. Exposition. Explaining. There’s too much of it here. Show. Stop telling.That’ll re-kindle the romance, then.

An Absolutely Remarkable Thing: Hank Green

Mmm, mmm, good. An absolutely remarkable first novel. So yummy that I confess I binge read it, with hooked fingers scooping New York Carl — cold — straight out of the can, not willing to go get a spoon, re-constitute it, or even wait and heat it up. Oh, and crackers? Fuggedaboutit!

However….however … I am getting tired of this whole literary GIRL-WHO-??? theme that states every work must seemingly include a precocious, sexually ambiguous, early-20s young woman whom everyone who comes in contact with her agrees to put their lives on complete hold for.

The Vital Abyss: James SA Corey

hmmm….the least readable of Corey’s Expanse series. This one, a novella, 5.5 in the series, covers the incarceration of the team responsible for the protomolecule.

Despite the usual quality writing, if I hadn’t been deep into the series, I would have found it of little to no interest as a stand alone.