Thor, God of Thunder, buys his legal weed in Canada

Some Canadian used a fake ID of Marvel’s Thor to buy weed online

Some Canadian used a fake ID of Marvel’s Thor to buy weed online

Who creates a fake ID, no matter if it’s just a joke fake ID, that isn’t even up to date?

By Brendan Bures, The Fresh Toast July 19, 2019

In Canada, you can buy weed online. This constitutes one of the numerous perks Canadians enjoy thanks to the recreational legalization of marijuana. Most of you will read that and have no further questions. What a novel and enviable concept, you will think.

Here’s the deal though: online Canadian dispensaries can’t just sell cannabis to anyone who clicks the digital button for “One Weed Please, Sir!!” Instead, prior to selling, Canadians must undergo a verification process that corroborates the purchaser is at least 18 years old— the age required to legally consume cannabis — and a Canadian citizen.

With any system of legitimacy comes those determined to infiltrate that system through nefarious means. Enter this wonderful tweet from @cottoncandaddy. Her sister works at an online weed dispensary and received this ID from none other than Thor Odinson. You know, the popular Marvel character played by Chris Hemsworth in the movies? A totally legitimate human you should sell marijuana to, right?

All the details of this fake ID really tickle the loins. For example, the fact that Thor apparently lives at “69 Big Hammer Ln.” An address that won’t raise any suspicion obviously. Or the picture of an idyllic Hemsworth smiling sheepishly off-camera or the wavy Windows 98 font (which all Alberta provincial IDs have in real life, by the way) that reads “Odinson Thor.”

The best part, though? The ID is totally expired! It’s been out of date for more than two years. Who creates a fake ID—no matter if it’s just a joke fake ID—that isn’t even up to date? Never stop being you, Canadians.

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Canada an even earlier adopter of cannabis than thought

Were the Vikings getting high on cannabis in Newfoundland?

Were the Vikings getting high on cannabis in Newfoundland?

Discovery of cannabis pollen found near a former Viking settlement in L’Anse aux Meadows has sparked controversy

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A discovery of cannabis pollen found near a former Viking settlement in Newfoundland has sparked controversy as to whether Vikings were using the drug.

Ancient Newfoundland archaeological site L’Anse aux Meadows, located in one of the northernmost areas of the province, was named a UNESCO World Heritage Site in the 1970s.

Last summer, archaeologists excavating a peat bog near the site uncovered a layer of environmental remnants potentially left by humans, dating to the 12th or early 1300s.iStock / Getty Images Plus

While most archaeologists contend that the site was only a host to Viking explorers for a short time in the 11th century, Memorial University postdoctoral fellow Paul Ledger has published a new paper in Proceedings of the National Academy of Science journal suggesting that Vikings may have lived in the area far later than previously believed — potentially well into the 12th and even part of the 13th century, Live Science notes.

Last summer, archaeologists excavating a peat bog near the site uncovered a layer of environmental remnants potentially left by humans, dating to the 12th or early 1300s.

The remnants included charcoal, several insects, and caribou feces, in addition, pollen from cannabis and walnut plants — neither of which is indigenous to the region.

While the evidence seems to suggest that the ancient Nordics were prolific cannabis users, Ledger urges caution in jumping to that conclusion.

“Pollen carries in the wind,” he notes in the study. While there is some evidence from other geographical regions that Vikings used cannabis, the remnants from L’Anse aux Meadows may have been transported there by an Indigenous Newfoundland group as opposed to ancient Europeans — such as ancestors of the Beothuk, whose forced migration at the hands of colonizers centuries later led to the extinction of the people.

The mystery persists!

Taxation WITH representation? What a concept!

Hmmm…233 years after a certain nation held a revolution to gain this basic right, Canada finally joins in.

For years, Canada refused to let its citizen living overseas to vote in Canadian elections, all the while on insisting on collecting taxes on the income they earned entirely overseas.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/supreme-court-expat-voting-rights-ruling-1.4970305

Supreme Court of Canada guarantees voting rights for expats

Decision makes a statement that ‘every citizen counts,’ expat advocate says

The Supreme Court of Canada has affirmed that Canadians living abroad for more than five years have the right to vote. (CBC)
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The Supreme Court of Canada has ruled that expats have the right to vote in federal elections no matter how long they have lived outside the country.

In a 5-2 decision, a majority of justices said the infringement to charter rights is not justified.

Writing for the majority, chief justice Richard Wagner said voting is a “fundamental political right, and the right to vote is a core tenet of our democracy.”

“Any limit on the right to vote must be carefully scrutinized and cannot be tolerated without a compelling justification,” the judgment reads.

The Liberal government already passed legislation last month that guaranteed voting rights to all Canadians residing outside the country, but Friday’s ruling could have the effect of preventing future governments from enacting legislation to limit voting rights for citizens living abroad.

Previous legislation enacted in 1993 barred non-residents from voting if they lived outside the country for more than five years. It was loosely enforced until the Conservative government of Stephen Harper, triggering a charter challenge by two Canadians living in the U.S. who were barred from voting in the 2011 election.

Gillian Frank and Jamie Duong, who worked at American universities because they could not find work in Canada, said they maintained deep ties to the country despite their residence abroad.

The judgment highlighted the global nature of modern society, and says that denying voting rights to non-resident citizens simply because they have crossed an “arbitrary” five-year threshold “does not stand scrutiny.”

‘Every citizen counts’
Under Bill 76, which amends the Canada Elections Act and passed in December, voters residing in other countries must only prove their identity and show proof of their previous address to determine the riding in which their ballot would be cast.

Colin Feasby, a lawyer for the Canadian Expat Association which intervened in the case, said the decision makes an important statement that “every citizen counts.”

“The majority explained that we live in a community defined by citizenship, not residency and that Canadians who live abroad are just as Canadian as those who live in Canada,” he said.

“The majority also rejected the philosophical ‘social contract’ argument advanced by the attorney general to limit voting rights and made it clear that a compelling justification presumably supported by evidence will be required to limit important charter rights in the future.”

The attorney general of Canada had argued Parliament’s decision to limit voting for long-term non-residents is “a demonstrably justified infringement of the charter right to vote,” and that a social contract exists between electors and lawmakers.

“One of its purposes was to maintain the fairness of the electoral system to the resident Canadian,” reads a legal factum filed with the Supreme Court. “The legal responsibilities of long-term non-resident citizens under Canadian domestic law are much less than the responsibilities of resident Canadians.”

Expat advocates argued before the Supreme Court that the right to vote is guaranteed under the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, is central to Canadian democracy and is a defining characteristic of Canadian citizenship. Denying them a vote was akin to treating them as second-class citizens, they argued.

Civil liberties advocates also welcomed the decision.

“The decision reinforces the right to vote as a fundamental right and the cornerstone of democracy — not something that Canadians must earn from the government,” said Kate Oja, a lawyer with the British Columbia Civil Liberties Association, in a statement.

New Pot Legalization Causes Unemployment (LOL)

https://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2018/07/25/pot-sniffing-dog-legalization-retirement_a_23489402/?utm_hp_ref=ca-news

Cannabis Legalization Forces 14 RCMP Sniffer Dogs Into Early Retirement
It will cost about $5,000 to train each new pup with the updated drug palette that excludes cannabis.
Holly McKenzie-SutterCanadian Press
RCMP police dog Tessy poses next to seized marijuana in an RCMP handout photo. There are a number of police dogs across the country who will be out of a job before October 17, as the RCMP prepares for cannabis legalization.
CANADIAN PRESS/HO-RCMP
RCMP police dog Tessy poses next to seized marijuana in an RCMP handout photo. There are a number of police dogs across the country who will be out of a job before October 17, as the RCMP prepares for cannabis legalization.
Earlier this month, the RCMP threw a retirement party in St. John’s, N.L., for a Labrador retriever named Luke.

As the saying goes, you can’t teach an old dog new tricks, and as cannabis legalization approaches, that puts Luke and other dogs like him out of work.

Luke, who sniffed more than five million of dollars’ worth of drugs during his time on the force, is one of 14 canines across the country who will be out of a job before October 17.

Traffic and interdiction dogs like Luke are trained to detect cannabis, but once the substance is legal, they can no longer be used to establish grounds for search in a traffic stop.

All 14 dogs need to be replaced, and it will cost about $5,000 to train each new pup with the updated drug palette that excludes cannabis.

Also on HuffPost:

Luke is the only dog retiring in Newfoundland and Labrador, but there are others in British Columbia, Alberta, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and Manitoba who will be hanging up their hats by October.

Traffic and interdiction dogs represent about 12 per cent of the total narcotics canine force. Staff Sgt. Gary Creed, senior trainer at the RCMP’s police dog service in Innisfail, Alta., says he considers this the largest group of dogs the force has ever had to replace at one time.

And with a staff of just seven trainers, Creed is not sure that the replacements will be ready before the legalization date.

“Yes, it’s going to be a strain on our budget, but it’s manageable,” Creed said.

“The federal government changes the laws on us, right, and we have to deal with it. And not just us, all police forces.”

The federal government changes the laws on us, right, and we have to deal with it.
The force’s general duty dogs can still be used in situations where cannabis is still illegal, or when grounds for search have already been established, minimizing the number of replacements.

But Creed said it’s been a work-in-progress figuring out how to manage the quick, sizable turnover.

In the scenario that the dogs aren’t trained by October 17, Creed said he isn’t sure how the officers will proceed in the field without their four-legged partners.

“The guys will just have to manage that out on the road,” said Creed.

The RCMP has updated the narcotics detection profile for its dogs before. A few years ago, the animals were taught to detect fentanyl — but adding one substance to the dogs’ training is significantly easier and cheaper than putting a whole group through a new course.

Earlier on HuffPost Canada:

U.S. Border Officials Might Already Know All About Your Cannabis Use
Health Canada Wants Crackdown On Pot Promotion At Concerts
Creed said he hopes to have the replacements ready for duty by the end of the year.

It takes between 20 and 50 days for a dog to complete the narcotics training at the Innisfail centre, where the force breeds and trains its canines.

The dogs are taught to detect illegal substances and run through training simulations before they’re sent off across the country with their new handlers.

For Luke, it’s been a long journey from the street to today’s cushy retirement.

Luke was recruited by Sgt. Don Bill, who found him at an animal shelter in St. John’s. Luke completed his training course with flying colours — and the Labrador retriever stood out among his peers at the training centre, where most are German shepherds bred specifically for duty.

They finally get to play all day.
His handler is retiring from the force as well, giving 11-year-old Luke an early retirement in July.

Caroline Nadeau, an RCMP spokeswoman, said the bond between the officer and dog is so strong that in most cases, the handlers keep their dogs as pets when they retire from active duty.

But Luke’s handler is moving to a colder climate, so he’s given Luke to a new home in St. John’s where he can enjoy his retirement.

Nadeau said Luke and the others will spend their days doing what dogs do best.

“They finally get to play all day.”

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Holly McKenzie-SutterCanadian Press

Firm Friends?

https://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2018/06/10/world/politics-diplomacy-world/firm-friends-macron-handshake-leaves-mark-trump/#.Wx5uFkgvyUl

Firm friends? Macron handshake leaves mark on Trump
AFP-JIJI

JUN 10, 2018
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LA MALBAIE, QUEBEC – They once shook hands for an eye-watering 29 seconds, with neither man willing to show a hint of weakness. Now Emmanuel Macron has left a firm impression on Donald Trump in their latest squeezing contest.

Photos that have gone viral show how Macron turned part of Trump’s hand pale with a blood-squeezing grip when they met Friday on the sidelines of the Group of Seven summit in Canada.

Another picture appears to show the 71-year-old Trump wincing slightly as he struggles to get to grips with his 40-year-old counterpart.

The relationship between the two alpha males has been something of a roller-coaster ride since they first met last year, epitomized by their infamous handshake marathon in Paris during Bastille Day celebrations last July.

Although Macron was given the honor of the first state visit of the Trump era in April, one of the most enduring images of the trip was when Trump brushed some flecks of dandruff off the Frenchman’s jacket in the White House.

The two men also traded jibes on Twitter in the build-up to the summit in Canada, which has been soured by Trump’s decision to impose tariffs on steel and aluminum exports from the European Union.

Despite their differences, the two men seem at least to enjoy a mutual respect.

“We have a very really good relationship, very special,” Trump told reporters after Friday’s handshake.