The End of an Era: Tsukuji Fish Market

https://edition.cnn.com/travel/article/tokyo-tsukiji-fish-market-toyosu/index.html

I used to love coming here in the morning…..

End of an era as Tokyo’s Tsukiji fish market closes

Patrick St. Michel, CNN • Updated 6th October 2018
02:50
Tokyo (CNN) — Following years of delays and plenty of controversy, Tokyo’s Tsukiji wholesale fish market, one of the city’s most popular destinations for international visitors, has finally shut its doors.
The October 6 closing marks the end of an era for a structure that has been central to the metropolis since the mid-1930s and was considered the biggest fish and seafood market in the world.
The market is moving to a new facility in eastern Tokyo — the Toyosu Fish Market — and is set to start operating October 16.
The opening stands as one of the biggest developments in Tokyo in 2018, closing one chapter for the city and beginning a new one.

Why Tsukiji means so much to Tokyo

For decades, Tokyo's Tsukiji market has been the beating heart of a world-class culinary capital, supplying Michelin-starred chefs.

For decades, Tokyo’s Tsukiji market has been the beating heart of a world-class culinary capital, supplying Michelin-starred chefs.
KAZUHIRO NOGI/AFP/AFP/Getty Images
The Tsukiji wholesale fish market opened in 1935, though similar venues have existed in the surrounding area since the early 1600s.
It quickly established itself as the biggest fish and seafood market in the world, and one of the largest wholesale markets, period.
According to various reports, vendors sell around five million pounds of seafood from all over the world at Tsukiji daily, which works out to about $28 million.
Besides being a vital business hub for all things aquatic, over the years Tsukiji also became a must-see Tokyo tourist destination.
Walking through the inner market — the area where vendors sell seafood to restaurants and other companies — was a sensory overload.
Most popular of all were the early morning tuna auctions, with visitors eagerly showing up daily to watch people bid on huge hunks of fish.
Just as intriguing was the outer market, an area around the main structure housing dozens of food stalls and restaurants. Visitors could enjoy some of the freshest seafood here — assuming they showed up early enough.

The move itself

Demonstrators protest against the impending move of the Tsukiji fish market to Toyosu on September 29, 2018.

Demonstrators protest against the impending move of the Tsukiji fish market to Toyosu on September 29, 2018.
KARYN NISHIMURA-POUPEE/AFP/AFP/Getty Images
Plans to move the fish market to Toyosu have been in motion for decades, but didn’t get serious until the early 2010s.
Why move? Reasons centered around the age of the structure itself — these buildings were constructed in 1935, after all — along with the fact the Tsukiji fish market sits on valuable real estate that could prove useful for and after the 2020 Tokyo Olympics.
There were hiccups along the way though.
The Toyosu market was originally supposed to open up in November of 2016, but was delayed for various reasons, including worries over contaminated soil.
The spot where the market was being constructed used to house a gas production plant, and it appeared the ground beneath had absorbed chemicals from this factory.
After a campaign to clean it up, experts declared the area safe for use this past summer. Now the setup is complete, with the new market set to open October 16.
It remains a divisive topic, however.
Many citizens of Tokyo worried a move from Tsukiji would deprive the city of a historical sight at a time when many longstanding destinations are starting to vanish.
Even more vocal were the vendors and workers at Tsukiji, who have held protests against the move at the old market in the days running up to its closure.

Toyosu: What to expect

An aerial photo of Tokyo's new Toyosu fish market.

An aerial photo of Tokyo’s new Toyosu fish market.
STR/AFP/AFP/Getty Images
Like it or not, the Toyosu move is happening.
For visitors coming to Tokyo hoping to experience it, here’s what to know.
The closest subway station to the new Toyosu fish market is Shijo-mae Station, located on the Yurikamome Line (the station actually connects directly to the market, so don’t worry about getting lost).
It’s only two stops from Toyosu Station, which also can be accessed via the Yurakucho Line. The market is the only real draw near this station, though Toyosu has a variety of restaurants and shopping centers worth exploring, while the Yurikamonme Line leads to Odaiba, a man-made island in Tokyo Bay.
For those hoping to get to the Toyosu market before sunrise, find a hotel in Toyosu or Odaiba.

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As we tour the city’s top sites, locals share what makes Tokyo one of the greatest cities in the world. Video by Black Buddha
Entry into the Toyosu market is free for all visitors, with those hoping to see the space at its liveliest advised to get there before 8 a.m.
The famous early morning tuna auctions will still be happening over at the new location, beginning at 4:30 a.m. daily.
Whereas at Tsukiji you had to get a reservation ticket, all you have to do now is show up and try to get a good spot on the special viewing platform.
All dining options are located in the structure as well now, with around 40 food stalls — most carried over from Tsukiji — set to operate.
Beyond that, visitors can also head up to the grass-carpeted roof to take in nice views of the city. Organizers also plan to move the famous Tsukiji shrine to the venue as well.
Remember — this is still a fish market thus low temperatures are the norm. Bring something warm to wear.
As for future plans, plans are reportedly underway to open a hotel and hot spring catered towards tourists at the market in the next few years.

But what about Tsukiji?

Tsukiji's outer market will continue to serve up incredible plates of sushi.

Tsukiji’s outer market will continue to serve up incredible plates of sushi.
Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images AsiaPac/Getty Images
All tourist-related activities at Tsukiji came to a close in late September, and the inner market shut down for good on October 6. But that doesn’t mean the area around the market is suddenly deserted.
The outer market — the one featuring all the food stalls and restaurants — will still be in operation.
Just go to Tsukiji Shijo station on the Oedo line or Tsukiji station on the Hibiya line to get there and enjoy a taste of what is now a part of Tokyo history.
You can also still join one of the many organized tours running in and around the outer market, to learn about the history of Tsukiji and see how it shaped this part of the city.
While the future has arrived with the Toyosu fish market — a venue that does away with the chaos of Tsukiji in favor of a visitor-friendly vibe — it’s still possible to enjoy a taste of the past, at least for a little while longer.
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Private Sector: Brian Haig

Haig writes his main character, Sean Drummond, as a tough soldier-turned-JAG lawyer wise-ass. Problem is, it only works part of the time. Readers fond of this character type would be much better served turning to Robert Crais’ Elvis Cole series.

Just Listening to the Snowflake Generation Gives Me Anxiety

U.K. student union bans applause in favour of ‘jazz hands’ because clapping could ‘trigger anxiety’

U.K. student union bans applause in favour of ‘jazz hands’ because clapping could ‘trigger anxiety’
Sara Khan, Manchester University’s liberation and access officer, argued that traditional applause was not sufficiently ‘accessible.’ Whooping is also discouraged

With jazz hands, no one gets hurt.Getty Images
The Telegraph
C
LONDON — Clapping has been replaced with “jazz hands” at a British student union amid fears that the noise of applause could trigger anxiety among some students.

Whooping is also discouraged at Manchester University student union events on the basis that the loud noise may be a problem for those with sensory issues.

The use of “jazz hands” — where students wave their hands in the air — is the British Sign Language expression for applause and is deemed a more inclusive gesture.

At the union’s first meeting of the year, Sara Khan, who is Manchester University’s liberation and access officer, argued that traditional applause was not sufficiently “accessible.” The union resolved to ban clapping in favour of “jazz hands,” and urged “student groups and societies to do the same.”

The students’ union also plans to make “BSL clapping” part of inclusion training for new students.

The union noted that “loud noises, including whooping and traditional applause, could pose an issue for students with disabilities, such as those with anxiety or sensory issues.” Jazz hands should be favoured at debates, panels and talks as well as at meetings of the student senate, it said.

Students who whoop, cheer and clap should face ‘consequences’

“Jazz hands” were adopted by the National Union of Students (NUS) in 2015 on the basis that clapping “triggers anxiety.” Delegates at last year’s NUS conference said that students who whoop, cheer and clap should face “consequences.”

Audience members were repeatedly warned that they must cease whooping to express support for a speaker because it had a “serious impact” on the accessibility of the conference for disabled students.

Critics of the move say that such behaviour is typical of an over-sensitive “snowflake generation” of students who are quick to take offence. Last year it emerged that Oxford University’s equality and diversity unit had issued guidance to students advising them that those who avoided making eye contact with their peers could be guilty of racism.

The University of Glasgow started issuing “trigger warnings” for theology students studying the crucifixion of Jesus Christ, whereby students would be told in advance that they may see distressing images and would be given the opportunity to leave the room.

Let’s silently hear it for jazz hands! Getty Images
Earlier this year, If, Rudyard Kipling’s poem of paternal advice, was scrubbed off a Manchester University building by university students who claimed he was a racist on the basis that the poem was a tribute to Leander Starr Jameson, the British colonial statesman who led the Jameson Raid against the South African Republic in 1895-6.

Student leaders at the university declared that Kipling stood “for the opposite of liberation, empowerment, and human rights.”

The poem, which had been painted on the wall of the students’ union building by an artist, was removed by students in a bid to reclaim history on behalf of those who had been oppressed by “the likes of Kipling.”

A union spokesman said the hand gesture referred to as “jazz hands” was “designed to support those with disabilities and/or sensory conditions to participate in events.”

They added: “Students’ unions strive to make their events welcoming to all of their students by acknowledging their experiences and responding to their needs.”

A spokesman for Manchester University said: “We consider this a matter for the Students’ Union.”

The Burglar in the Closet: Lawrence Block

My last review was of a book by Nancy Kress, a Writer’s Digest columnist. Today’s book was also written by a former columnist for the same magazine, Lawrence Block.

I have been a fan of Block’s, a repeat Edgar Award writer, for many years.

His Bernie Rhodenbarr “burglar” series was probably my least favourite of his several serials. Recently, I re-read his 2nd entry in the series, “The Burglar in the Closet.”

Unfortunately, it wasn’t as good as I remember his other series. Either I or this work haven’t aged well. The writing is a bit too “loose,” with too many coincidences and self-expository passages to make it a good read.

The reader would do well to try Block’s “Scudder” series, or even the “Evan Tanner” offerings.

Seal attacks kayaker with octopus

Seal attacks kayaker with octopus

By Euan McKirdy, CNN

https://edition.cnn.com/2018/09/26/asia/new-zealand-octopus-seal-kayak-attack-intl/index.html

(CNN)Well, that was a slap in the face.

An Instagram user has uploaded video that shows a seal swimming up from the depths, armed with an octopus, which it flings across the face of an unsuspecting kayaker.
Geo-tagged off the coast of Kaikoura on New Zealand’s South Island, paddler Kyle Mulinder, along with a number of other kayakers, is seen on the footage watching a seal swim underwater, hunting the octopus.
As they chat about the seal, it can be seen surfacing next to Mulinder’s kayak, before launching out of the water, prey in mouth, to deliver an almighty slap to the Kiwi.
Mulinder is momentarily taken aback by the attack before shouting out in surprise.

His friend, Taiyo Masuda, told CNN it was a “beautiful day (and) seals were swimming and enjoying sun on the rocks.
“Right around lunchtime, several seals started to swim around. We just thought they were refreshing their body, yet apparently they were seeking more of food.
“One seal swims right next to us, having an octopus in his mouth, pops right up of the surface next to us, then tries to chew up the leg but ended up slapping our face!
“We instantly started laughing, we certainly got surprised. We are all adventure guys but we don’t encounter that every day! Such a raw moment, brought us so much laughter to all of us all day long… What a day to remember!”

The octopus stuck around — literally — suctioning onto the bottom of Mulinder’s kayak until it was prized off by a fellow kayaker’s oar. It then disappeared underwater.

Because you can’t choose your family ….

These six — yes, six — siblings of a Republican congressman just endorsed his opponent

These six — yes, six — siblings of a Republican congressman just endorsed his opponent
The Gosar siblings said their brother, who has long drawn headlines for his far-right views, and his politics were simply too much for them to stomach

Rep. Paul Gosar, R-Ariz., speaks during a bus tour stop in Paulden, Ariz., on Aug. 24. MUST CREDIT: Bloomberg photo by Caitlin O’HaraCaitlin O’Hara / Bloomberg
Washington Post
Eli Rosenberg
September 22, 2018
1:03 PM EDT

Families are complicated, their private tensions and political disagreements often kept under wraps.

That’s not the case with Rep. Paul Gosar, R-Ariz., whose opponent in the midterm election just got a boost from Gosar’s siblings.

Six of them.

The brothers and sisters — Tim, Jennifer, Gaston, Joan, Grace and David — appeared in campaign advertisements for David Brill, the Democrat hoping to unseat Gosar in Arizona’s 4th Congressional District in the upcoming midterm election.

The Gosar siblings framed their endorsement of Brill as a matter of values, saying their brother, who has long drawn headlines for his far-right views, and his politics were simply too much for them to stomach.

“We gotta stand up for our good name,” said brother David Gosar in the advertisement. “This is not who we are.”

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“I couldn’t be quiet any longer, nor should any of us be,” said sister Grace Gosar.

“I think my brother has traded a lot of the values we had at our kitchen table,” said another sister, Joan.

In an interview with The Washington Post, David Gosar, 57, a lawyer in Jackson, Wyoming, said he felt obligated to speak out against his brother because of his views, though he wished it weren’t the case.

“There isn’t a kooky, crazy, nutty thing that he isn’t a part of,” he said. “What are we supposed to do?”

I think my brother has traded a lot of the values we had at our kitchen table

David said he doesn’t talk to his brother much anymore. The split came around the time of his congressional run, when, David said, his brother told him he believed the “birther” theory that President Barack Obama’s birth certificate is fake. (A 2010 clip from Politico quotes Paul Gosar as declining to say whether he believed Obama was born in the United States, saying it was “for the courts and for other people to decide.”)

“I was like, ‘Oh my God, you have to be kidding me,’ and then he went and got elected,” David Gosar said. “I’m not going to break bread with a racist.”

Paul Gosar did not respond to a request for comment sent to his spokeswoman.

Gosar, who became a congressman in 2013, has drawn coverage for his extreme rhetoric in recent years.

In January, he drew bipartisan rebukes after he said that he asked the Capitol Police and Attorney General Jeff Sessions to check IDs at the State of the Union to arrest and deport any undocumented immigrants in attendance.

At least one senator, Dick Durbin, D-Ill., planned to bring an undocumented “dreamer” to the speech as a guest.

The next month, Gosar said FBI and Department of Justice officials such as Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, former acting Attorney General Sally Yates, and former FBI Director James Comey should face “treason” charges due to developments in the Russia investigation.

This summer, he spoke at a rally in London for one of Britain’s most notorious anti-Muslim campaigners, Tommy Robinson, drawing rebukes from Muslim-American groups.

But perhaps his most notorious moment came in 2017 in an interview with Vice News, when he spread a baseless conspiracy theory that the white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, that summer had been “created by the left.”

He also brought up the common right-wing falsehood that the liberal philanthropist and financier George Soros, who survived the Holocaust, had collaborated with Nazis.

Seven siblings — there are ten in total, including Paul — responded at the time by writing a letter to the Kingman Daily Miner, a newspaper in Gosar’s district, decrying his comments in blunt terms.

“We are aghast that Paul has sunk so low that he now spews the most despicable slander against an 87-year-old man without a shred of proof,” the letter said. “Those aren’t our family values or the values of the small Wyoming town we grew up in … It is extremely upsetting to have to call you out on this, Paul, but you’ve forced our hand with your deceit and anti-Semitic dog whistle.”

Pete Gosar, who was the seventh signee of the letter, ran for governor of Wyoming as a Democrat in 2014.

Brill’s ads, of which there are at least three, were filmed in Jackson and Laramie, Wyoming. Brill’s team reached out to the Gosar siblings after seeing some of their criticism on social media, according to the Phoenix New Times.

A doctor and a businessman before he decided to run for office, Brill has campaigned on a public health option like Medicare available to all and a platform of lowering the national debt, according to the Arizona Republic.

Those aren’t our family values or the values of the small Wyoming town we grew up in … It is extremely upsetting to have to call you out on this, Paul, but you’ve forced our hand with your deceit and anti-Semitic dog whistle

He faces an uphill battle for the seat; Gosar trounced his Democratic opponent in the deep-red district in 2016, receiving 71.5 percent of the votes. The counties that make up Gosar’s district voted heavily for Donald Trump.

Family members who split with their political kin tend to draw attention and media coverage and are often sought by opposing campaigns.

In the recent election cycle, the son of retiring Republican Rep. Bob Goodlatte of Virginia made waves when he endorsed the Democrat running to replace him in August. In the Wisconsin race to replace Paul Ryan, the brother of Democrat Randy Bryce endorsed his Republican opponent in an advertisement by an conservative group.

David Gosar said that Paul Gosar’s politics have caused a strain in the family, which hails from the small town of Pinedale, Wyoming.

In one of the ads, Grace Gosar, a doctor, says, “It would be difficult to see my brother as anything but a racist.” David Gosar said that their parents, who are in their 80s, are Republicans and support his brother. And David says he’s disappointed in the other three siblings who didn’t stand with them for the advertisement.

He said he’s also upset by people who tell him that there’s something wrong with breaking with his family or who make the situation into a joke.

“This is serious stuff, and I’m tired of people making light of it. This is causing serious damage to the country,” he said. “If you can’t speak out against your family, then don’t be a hypocrite and speak out against someone else’s family member.”

Nancy Kress: Beggars in Spain

I’ve always admired Nancy Kress’ columns in Writer’s Digest. This is the first book of hers I’ve read.

And it’s really, really good! Set in the future where gene modification allows a select group of people not to need sleep, they find that they also become super intelligent and never age.

Society struggles to accommodate this new “species” and conflict ensues.

Good read! Part of a trilogy, so I’m looking forward to the next two.